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Preventing hypoglycemia

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Carefully following the diabetes management plan you and your doctor developed is vital in preventing hypoglycemia. Your diabetes management plan is designed to match the dose and timing of your medication/s to your usual schedule of meals and activities. Any mismatch in your medication/s and meals/activities could result in hypoglycemia.

Posted: October 11th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

The dangers of hypoglycemia

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Our digestive system breaks down carbohydrates from foods such as rice, bread, pasta, fruits and vegetables into various forms of simple sugars. One of these sugars is glucose, the body’s main source of energy.

Posted: September 13th, 2013 in Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Traveling with diabetes

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For diabetics, especially those on insulin, travel can be daunting. This article aims to help diabetics reduce the stress of traveling and make planning for a trip as enjoyable as possible.

Posted: September 6th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Insulin therapy for children and pregnant women

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Not too long ago, the common type of diabetes in children and teens was type 1, a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or virtually no insulin. Today, no thanks to obesity brought on by physical inactivity and unhealthy eating habits, more and more young individuals are developing type 2 diabetes, the more common form that occurs when the body becomes resistant to the actions of insulin apart from not making enough insulin.

Posted: August 16th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Insulin pens provide more convenience and accuracy

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Many people with diabetes require insulin therapy to maintain optimal blood glucose control and prevent complications. Insulin is recognized as one of the most effective treatments for diabetes mellitus. However, one of the greatest difficulties facing individuals with diabetes who need to inject insulin is the social stigma associated with insulin shots.

Posted: August 3rd, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Diabetes medications that promote weight loss

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Most patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are above their ideal weight. Excess weight, particularly around the waist, is a major cause of insulin resistance, a condition in which the body does not use insulin effectively causing glucose to build up in the blood instead of being absorbed by the cells. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes.

Posted: July 27th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Managing diabetes a team effort

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Finding the right team of skilled health professionals will help you manage your diabetes. Individuals with diabetes are often treated by a primary care physician, usually a family medicine specialist or internist. However primary care physicians will refer patients with more severe diabetes, particularly those requiring insulin therapies, to a diabetes specialist or endocrinologist.

Posted: July 20th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Diabetes is incurable but can be managed

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Although some of the world’s best scientists have been working on it for decades, a permanent and complication-free cure for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus has yet to be developed.

Posted: July 13th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

How diabetes damages the body

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Glucose is a type of sugar that all cells of the body use as fuel. It moves through the blood to different parts of the body at normal levels (5.0-7.7mmol/dl). But if glucose levels are persistently elevated in the bloodstream, it becomes a slow-acting poison killing the body

Posted: July 5th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Insulin helps you live life to the fullest

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Many people with diabetes are wary of taking insulin for a variety of reasons. These include the belief that taking insulin represents a personal failure, insulin is not effective, insulin causes complications or even death, insulin injections are painful as well as fear of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels), loss of independence and weight gain.

Posted: June 28th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Two types of insulin: human and analog

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Glucose is a type of sugar from food that the body uses for energy. The level of glucose in the bloodstream usually rises after a meal. To be efficiently utilized by the body, glucose in the bloodstream needs to enter the body’s cells. If glucose is unable to enter the cells, blood glucose levels rise leading to hyperglycemia. Long-term hyperglycemia damages nerves, blood vessels and vital organs.

Posted: June 21st, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Keys to diabetes control

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Being diagnosed with diabetes doesn’t mean you have to give up on your favorite foods and eat a complicated, unappetizing diet. You just need to make smart food choices and eat in moderation. The foods that are healthy for people with diabetes are also good choices for the rest of the family.

Posted: June 14th, 2013 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Headlines,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

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