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Being good is never enough

/ 12:02 AM January 10, 2016

When we dare to do the difficult or near impossible, it stretches our comfort zone and we become stronger, more confident, and better in the process.

Last year, I was thrown a challenge to become a Trustee of the People Management Association of the Philippines (PMAP), and I initially turned it down. I imagined how it would take me away from focusing on my business, my training programs, and my professional speaking career-it was scary.

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What changed my mind? Friendship-I could not bear the thought of abandoning a friend and colleague, President Obet Policarpio. I believe that PMAP leaders need the support of every member in good standing. After all, our leaders devote their time, talents, and efforts for the benefit of all members-on a voluntary basis.

After praying about it and asking for wisdom, I realized that I was being selfish, if I had turned it down with finality. Over the years, I have come to appreciate, respect and love the mission, vision, and values of PMAP. What better way of showing how I feel about PMAP than serving it as Trustee?

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God honoured my commitment-to my utter surprise; my business, my training programs and my professional speaking career took off like a rocket, almost immediately after I accepted the position of Trustee.

What happened? By forgetting about myself and focusing on something larger than my own life, I achieved an inner peace. There is something special about a person with inner peace-you become irresistible!

I was so inspired by this unexpected turn of events in my life that I became even more open to the infinite possibilities around me and beyond our borders.

Going global

Last October, a former female executive of SGS, who’s now living in Dubai, mentioned that our kabayans are not treated fairly by their Emirate bosses.

She is a leader of the IT group of Filipinos working in the UAE, and she discovered that  our kabayans, who are working longer hours and accept other assignments are paid much less than their foreign counterparts. When they complain about it, they were told, “That’s too much pay for a Filipino.”

I reacted furiously when I heard this and I told her, “They don’t have to put up with this unfair treatment.They need to become more assertive and strategic in their communication. I can teach them these skills.”

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Of course, my friend was ecstatic when she heard this. She then proceeded to ask her colleagues and associates if they would be willing to attend a training program entitled “Assertive and Strategic Communication.” Several of them immediately committed to register for this program, which is scheduled in mid-February. One day will be conducted for Dubai participants, while the next day will be for Abu Dhabi participants.

Knowing that their employers are all foreigners like Indians, Jordanians and Egyptians, I decided to dedicate Module 1 to cultural adaptation, to help them to understand the culture of each foreigner, adapt to each culture and create a win-win working environment.

This will be my first visit to the UAE, and it’s thrilling to think that not only will my plane fare, hotel accommodation, meals, and tours be paid by the organizer of this program, but I will also be paid a substantial professional fee in US dollars.

How did this happen so quickly? I believe that it happened, because I responded quickly to a perceived need. This is a great insight for me-when we focus on the needs of others, we will be rewarded beyond our wildest expectations.

Life lessons

Carrie Romine once said and I quote, “I am in competition with no one. I have no desire to play the game of being better than anyone. I am simply trying to be better than the person I was yesterday.”

Another writer, Lidia Castillo, said and I quote, “Your beliefs don’t make you a better person-your behaviour does.”

My mentor, Dr. Denis Waitley, one of the world’s foremost authorities on human behaviour, told me several years ago, “Don’t make the mistake of running after success, fame and fortune. Just get better everyday, and success, fame and fortune will run after you.”

Looking forward

I am absolutely sure that the future holds limitless opportunities for me. All I need to do is to be open-minded, develop myself continuously, and focus on the needs of others.

I will be guided by two significant principles:

  1. We may all have limits, like being too short or too tall, too small or too large, but we have no limitations. Limits are physical, while limitations are psychological-they are all in the mind. If you think you can, you can. If you think you cannot, you never will.
  1. Humility is not putting yourself down or not accepting people’s compliments of your strengths and talents. Humility happens when you stop thinking of yourself and start thinking of others.

Finally, my life will be dedicated to becoming better, one day at a time.

Dina H. Loomis is the President and CEO of the Southeast Asia Speakers and Trainers Bureau, Inc. Visit her website www.dinahlomis.com. Loomis is currently a member of the Board of Trustees of the People Management Association of the Philippines (PMAP), the premier organization of HR practitioners and people managers in the country. For news and updates from PMAP, you may call 7261532, email [email protected], visit www.pmap.org.ph or like www.fb.com/PMAP1956.

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TAGS: assertive, Career, challenge, comfort zone, communication, limits, opportunities, People Management Association of the Philippines (PMAP), professional, strategic, strengths, training, trustee, working
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