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‘Juan’ destroys rice, corn crops


Agence France-Presse
First Posted 12:53:00 10/19/2010

Filed Under: Disasters (general), Agriculture, Economy and Business and Finance

MANILA, Philippines ? Super Typhoon ?Juan? (international codename: Megi) has destroyed huge tracts of rice and corn crops in the country, officials said Tuesday, warning the Southeast Asian country could be forced to import more of the foodstuffs.

The crops were ready for harvest when Juan, the most powerful typhoon to hit the Philippines in four years, smashed the northern parts of the main island of Luzon on Monday, the officials said.

The Philippines, the world's largest rice importer, may have to buy more from overseas next year if the losses prove great, said Maura Lizarondo, assistant director of the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics.

"You have to provide food -- what else could we do," Lizarondo told AFP.

The Philippines imported 2.4 million tons of rice last year, but the bureau had hoped to bring that down to 1.5 million tons for 2011.

Initial field reports are not encouraging, with the governor of the key agricultural province of Isabela estimating 385,000 tons of rice and 46,400 tons of corn will be lost.

Although the northern third of the country is regularly struck by typhoons, the timing of Juan was crucial because it coincided with the biggest of the year's four harvests, Lizarondo said.

"That's the way it is with agriculture. Even if you put in all the inputs like irrigation and fertilizer, it is still very dependent on the weather," Lizarondo said.

Isabela is part of the Cagayan Valley region, which accounted for 13.25 percent of last year's rice output and 24.26 percent of corn production, Lizarondo said.

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council in Manila said it had no figures yet on the total area of farms affected by the typhoon.

The National Food Authority, the state grains importing monopoly, had no immediate comment on the possible effect on rice import volumes.



Copyright 2014 Agence France-Presse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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