For a new generation of students, it’s not just all about getting high grades | Inquirer Business
CAREER READINESS WIDELY DEEMED AS A SUCCESS FACTOR

For a new generation of students, it’s not just all about getting high grades

For a new generation of students, it’s not just all about getting high grades

PRACTICAL For Pinoy students, skill competency is the most important success factor.—Photo from FEU Tech

Marvin Paul Aquinde, 20, believes that a student’s life is not just all about getting high academic grades; neither should learning be confined to the four corners of a classroom.

Aquinde, who is taking up a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology from a reputable university in Metro Manila, says that the curriculum should also include learning practical skills to better prepare an individual for eventual entry into the workforce.

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“There is value [in learning practical skills], especially if it is related to your academics. It’s also good so you don’t just limit yourself to one skill,” he says.

Despite his course at the university focusing more on the software aspect of computer technology, Aquinde says he wants to learn more about hardware, as well as practical skills in troubleshooting and upgrading computer components.

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“I would like to learn more about the latest computer components like memory devices and power supply, and cybernetics—you know, those things that are not yet in the books. I would like to know the pros and cons of using a particular component, and when is the right time to upgrade components,” he adds.

He observes that technology has been advancing so quickly that one needs to constantly stay up to date with the latest news on computer hardware since new releases happen almost on a yearly basis.

According to a study by US-based educational technology firm Instructure, skill competency is the most important factor in defining success for Filipino students, with 92 percent of the 469 responses in a July 2022 survey reflecting this sentiment.

Success factors

“As more employers in a variety of industries are reducing degree requirements and favoring hiring on the basis of demonstrated skills and competencies, universities need, more than ever, to innovate in the offering of short courses and microcredentials to meet the expectations of a new generation of students who want to enter the workforce, or upskill, quickly and cost-effectively,” Instructure regional vice president for the Asia Pacific Harrison Kelly says.

Based on the study, 86 percent of student-respondents cite work or career readiness as an important factor for success, while 83 percent mention holistic development and 83 percent cite skill diversity.

“The data show that offering skills-based learning programs and recognizing the increased demand for a positive [return on investment] for higher education are the cornerstones for the great reset of global higher education,” the report says.

“We continue to see the shift in the overall student identity as it relates to success. While grades remain important—especially to students—administrators, faculty and students are defining success more holistically and adjusting campus support to match that definition of success and to show the value of a degree,” it adds. INQ

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