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Int’l tourist arrivals for 2018 exceed UN expectations so far

/ 09:41 PM June 27, 2018

Image: Michal Krakowiak/Istock.com via AFP Relaxnews

A rise in international travel to countries in Asia-Pacific and Europe helped drive up global tourist arrival numbers by 6 percent in the first four months of 2018, exceeding the United Nations’ World Tourism Organization expectations.

According to the latest stats from the UNWTO, between January and April of this year, international arrivals increased by 8 percent in the Asia Pacific region.

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At the sub-regional level, international tourist arrivals spiked 10 percent for countries in Southeast Asia and 9 percent across South Asia.

Not far behind, Europe also saw a 7 percent spike in international tourist arrivals during the same period, thanks to strong performances from destinations in the south and Mediterranean, and Western Europe.

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South America showed the strongest results in the Americas, with 8 percent growth in international tourist visitors, while the Caribbean, which is still recovering from the aftermath of devastating hurricanes last year, experienced a decrease of 9 percent during this period.

The first four months of the year represent 28 percent of the yearly total arrivals and includes the winter sports season in the Northern Hemisphere, the summer season for the Southern Hemisphere, Chinese New Year and Easter, among others. JB

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TAGS: South Asia, Tourism, tourists, UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), UNWTO
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