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‘Denerving’ new treatment for uncontrolled hypertension

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The practice of Medicine can indeed be very humbling. Being an inexact science with no clear road signs of where to go, it can throw medical scientists into a maze in which they can’t find the way out.

Posted: April 5th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Dental amalgams—boon or bane?

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The weight of available scientific evidence favors the safety of dental amalgams as a filling material. Locally known as “silver pasta,” it is actually a mixed alloy of mercury (50 percent), silver (22-32 percent), tin (14 percent), copper (8 percent) and a small amount of other metals.

Posted: March 29th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Dental amalgams—boon or bane?

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A dilemma healthcare professionals like doctors and dentists constantly face is how to balance the beneficial and potentially harmful side effects of all drugs and substances we give our patients. In fact, even placebo or “dummy pills,” which contain no active ingredients, have been shown to have side effects in clinical trials when the patients are “blinded,” or they don’t know whether they’re taking placebo or the active drug.

Posted: March 22nd, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Medical marijuana—boon or bane?

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Food and Drugs Authority (FDA) Director Kenneth Hartigan-Go advises the proponents of legalizing medical marijuana to exhaust available legal channels and processes to have it approved for the right indications and the right set of patients.

Posted: March 15th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Medical marijuana–boon or bane?

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Is marijuana nature’s medicinal leaf, or is it a gateway to perdition? This is a question I’ve been struggling to answer for quite some time now.

Posted: March 8th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Salty reactions

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After our last week’s column on how excessive salt intake could harm our health, I received a number of negative reactions, with most saying that making everyone adhere to a low-salt diet is easier said than done. I can see where most people are coming from thinking that cutting down on salt means putting up with bland and tasteless food.

Posted: March 1st, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Be ‘salt of the earth’ but eat less salt

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Salt is an essential mineral substance and the tissues of the human body require it for normal functioning. Sodium in salt is necessary to conduct nerve impulses, contract and relax muscles, and maintain the proper balance of water and minerals. It being an essential mineral is reflected by the idiom “salt of the earth,” referring to persons who are deemed most worthy of emulation.

Posted: February 22nd, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Hypertension ‘storm surge’ in Asia Pacific

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Today, Saturday, I’m delivering my valedictory address as outgoing president of the Asian Pacific Society of Hypertension. I titled my talk “Addressing the Hypertension ‘Storm Surge’ in the Asian Pacific Region.” I hope my call to action will be heeded seriously by the hypertension experts from 38 countries who attended the congress.

Posted: February 15th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

High BP, Philippine setting

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Emotional problems, especially depression, have been frequently reported as aggravating factors in hypertension.

Posted: February 7th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

High BP, Philippine setting

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Local hypertension experts are starting to get disheartened. Despite all efforts to control high blood pressure (BP) in the country, the prevalence of hypertension is still progressively increasing—from 11 percent in 1992 to 28 percent, based on the latest survey conducted by Dr. Jorge Sison’s team of researchers in the Council on Hypertension of the Philippine Heart Association.

Posted: January 31st, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Unproven claims of alkaline or oxygenated water

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We’ve said time and again that water is one of the best natural medicines and we should drink enough of it daily to remain healthy. Up to now, patients have been asking me about the purported health benefits of alkaline, ionized or oxygenated water. A few years ago, we wrote in this column that plain water is still the best and that the claimed advantages of all these types of “other waters” are not based on scientific evidence. It’s more of a marketing hype rather than science-based.

Posted: January 24th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

Asian Pacific hypertension congress

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The Philippine Society of Hypertension and Philippine Lipid and Atherosclerosis Society, together with several other medical organizations and the Department of Health, are hosting the Asian Pacific Society of Hypertension congress in Cebu City on Feb. 12-15. This is definitely going to be a big international event, which all doctors, researchers and government personnel involved in the diagnosis, treatment and control of high blood pressure should attend.

Posted: January 17th, 2014 in Columnists,Featured Columns,Inquirer Columns,Inquirer Features,Science and Health | Read More »

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